Contemplating Compliance at the SCCE’s London Conference

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By Sorcha Diver
Sca29@allstate.com

The sessions at this week’s London conference of the SCCE have covered such a variety of topics, but it was the little points raised and examples given that stood out for me. It was arresting to realise that legislation governing the use of hotline reporting across many European countries is heavily influenced by historical events, especially WW2, and the mark those experiences have left on those countries.

It’s a great reminder in today’s global compliance world that compliance is all about people and how they act as individuals, and at the organizational and even national level. As compliance is such a new profession, I sometimes feel we spend quite a bit of time justifying our existence and explaining that we aren’t just there to carry out a box ticking exercise. No more compelling an example was given in yesterday’s session on risk assessment by Sally March and Ruth Steinholz, when Sally highlighted the example of the Morgan Stanley risk and security manager who predicted both attacks on the twin towers, and whose mitigation strategy of drilling the employees thoroughly in evacuation procedures is credited with saving many lives on the day of the attack. A sobering thought that any of us might one day make such a difference.

[bctt tweet=”@SCCE #Compliance is all about people and how they act as individuals, and at the organizational and even national level”]

Yesterday for me was finished off (and I was well and truly woken up!) by Kristy Grant-Hart’s fantastic session on using sales techniques to, well, sell compliance. I went along reluctantly, definitely not seeing myself as a salesperson, but thought maybe that in itself was a good reason to attend, and ended up loving the different take on what’s sometimes seen as a pretty dry profession!

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